Fighting Parkinson’s, and acceptance…and denial…

Accepting you have Parkinson’s disease is the first step in fighting the disease. Acceptance goes something like this: “I accept that I have Parkinson’s Disease…what am I going to do about it to recover?” The “what am I going to do about it to recover” is the difficult part because it presumes something that requires you to discard conventional protocol for Parkinson’s — it presumes that you can do something about it to recover. Oh, yes, it also means that you have to take responsibility to heal yourself.

Acceptance Affirmations.
“I accept that I have Parkinson’s Disease.”
“I accept that I can do something about it.”
“I accept responsibility to do something about it.”
“I accept that doing the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® puts me on my path toward recovery.”
“I accept that Howard and two others have fully recovered doing the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery®, and many others are improving their Parkinson’s and writing about it on this blog.”
“I accept that I will do the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® and stay on my recovery path until I fully recover.”
“I accept that ‘I have the power to heal myself’ and that I am healing myself.”
“I accept that I have Parkinson’s Disease.
“I accept that I am recovering every day I do something positive in furtherance of my recovery.”
“I accept that I am worth it.”

Denial Affirmations.
Unhealthy denial.
“I deny that I have Parkinson’s Disease.” This type of denial is unhealthy because if you cannot accept that you have the disease, then you will be doing nothing to fight it. This leads to it getting worse.
Healthy denial.
“I deny that Parkinson’s is incurable.”
“I deny there is nothing I can do to recover from Parkinson’s.”
“I deny that unless I am taking medications or having brain surgery, I am doing nothing for my Parkinson’s.”
“I deny that the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery® will not work for me.”
“I deny that I am not worth it.”

On the days when symptoms seem worse and fear creeps in, it is more difficult to keep the Acceptance and Denial affirmations stated above in the positive thinking, good attitude areas. Here is something to assist you:

Please remember that the journey you are on is life, not Parkinson’s. Parkinson’s is just something happening in the journey called life, so you deal with it while you are living your life to its fullest. Every road has bumps…it is how you view the bumps that matters…some people see the bumps as roadblocks to life; I preferred to see the bumps as nuisances that made me slow down and navigate more carefully. And lo and behold, while I was slowing down and navigating my life more carefully with my Parkinson’s bumps, I noticed so many beautiful things I had been missing, so my Parkinson’s bumps in the road became such a blessing. They became mere signs to follow that I needed to pay more attention to healing my life. And, when I finished healing my life, my soul, mind, and body, I did not need any more messages or signs, and they left.

Acceptance. Accept that you have Parkinson’s.
Denial. Deny that you cannot fully recover and be cured.
The Journey. The journey is life. Be alive and live your life to its fullest, despite Parkinson’s.

You are worth it!!!

All my best,

Howard

 

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7 Responses to Fighting Parkinson’s, and acceptance…and denial…

  1. judy says:

    thanx, Howard…..very uplifting and helpful message…..how can I deny that God led me to your website?….it is changing my life….thank-you, God….

  2. Sally says:

    Thank you so much, Howard.

  3. Marilyn Murray says:

    this message has now become my mission statement, to be read daily.Again Howard your words speak truth to me, thank you. And there are even parts of this statement that I am already doing, which admitting to is a big step for me, there is a lot more Joy in my life now.

  4. Bev says:

    THIS IS WORTH REPEATING. Please remember that the journey you are on is life, not Parkinson’s. Parkinson’s is just something happening in the journey called life, so you deal with it while you are living your life to its fullest. Every road has bumps…it is how you view the bumps that matters…some people see the bumps as roadblocks to life; I preferred to see the bumps as nuisances that made me slow down and navigate more carefully. And lo and behold, while I was slowing down and navigating my life more carefully with my Parkinson’s bumps, I noticed so many beautiful things I had been missing, so my Parkinson’s bumps in the road became such a blessing. They became mere signs to follow that I needed to pay more attention to healing my life. And, when I finished healing my life, my soul, mind, and body, I did not need any more messages or signs, and they left.

    Thank you, Howard, for these words of wisdom. What an awesome blessing to share with us! bev

  5. Helen says:

    Thank you Howard once again for the reminder have a great day everyone love Helen

  6. Beverly Bowers says:

    I just re-read “Fighting Parkinson’s chipping away day by day” and it sure brought thought to the forefront again. From August 29, 2012. Thanks, Howard.

  7. Sandy Vallone says:

    I just completed my morning “recipe” and wanted to thank you for the hope and faith your recipe gives me. I’m getting more consistent with my practice and the time this gives me for my healing. I’m doubting less and enjoying the time for healing more. When I don’t do the practice, instead of berating myself, I forgive myself for the omission and just do it the next morning. I have noticed a wonderful insight from doing this quiet and dedicated practice. I have never truly made serious and dedicated time for me to connect and listen to my body, mind and spirit. Maybe this is the blessing of early symptoms of PD. I have come to really appreciate this time I make for the “recipe”, talking to my spirit, noticing electrical impulses, really tuning in to my mind, body and spirit. Heartfelt thanks for your book and your blog…they really have helped me.

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