Fighting Parkinson’s, and Parkinson’s is not a life sentence

When you received the diagnosis that you had Parkinson’s, you also were told it was incurable. Essentially, you were sentenced to a life sentence of Parkinson’s. You were sentenced to a progressively degenerative disease. You were sentenced to never getting better or staying the same, but only getting worse. The question is rather simple: Do you accept the life sentence or do you appeal it to a higher authority?

I would imagine that if you are here and reading this blog, then you are not only appealing the Parkinson’s life sentence to a higher authority, but you are also doing everything possible to overturn the life sentence. Good for you!

Faith. Attitude. Action. Progress. Overturning the Life Sentence. That is the formula to your cure.

Faith. Sometimes it is difficult to keep faith alive, particularly on those days where you feel like a prisoner in your own body. You know the days, when walking is hard and eating is hard, and extreme slowness, stiffness, and tremors are the flavors of the day. This is where faith is critical. Without faith, you throw in the towel, go back in your prison cell and shut the door, and serve out your Parkinson’s life sentence in misery. Faith says, “It doesn’t have to be that way.” If you are struggling with faith, please click here.

Attitude. Sometimes it is difficult to have a positive attitude, particularly on those days where you feel like a prisoner in your own body. You know the days, when walking is hard and eating is hard, and extreme slowness, stiffness, and tremors are the flavors of the day. This is where a positive attitude is critical. Without a positive attitude, you throw in the towel, go back in your prison cell and shut the door, and serve out your Parkinson’s life sentence in misery. A positive attitude says, “I can do this and cure myself.” If you are struggling with keeping a positive attitude, please click here.

Action. Sometimes it is difficult to take action, particularly on those days where you feel like a prisoner in your own body. You know the days, when walking is hard and eating is hard, and extreme slowness, stiffness, and tremors are the flavors of the day. This is where taking action is critical. Without taking action, you throw in the towel, go back in your prison cell and shut the door, and serve out your Parkinson’s life sentence in misery. Taking action says, “I am doing my best, and my best is good enough.” If you are struggling with taking action, please click here.

Progress. Every day you are taking action and doing the Parkinson’s Recipe for Recovery&#0174 with faith in your cure and a “can do” attitude about being your own cure, you are making progress. Progress is not determined by what your symptoms look like. You are so much more than a set of Parkinson’s symptoms, so please do not define yourself or allow others to define you by how much you are shaking on a particular day. That shaking is not YOU! If you are struggling with your own progress and can use a boost from your fellow travelers on this path, please click here.

Overturning the Life Sentence. When appealing to a higher authority in a court of law, they want to know what is the precedent for overturning the sentence. Here is your precedent:
I did the Recipe and I am cured.
Marie did the Recipe and she is cured.
Pratima did the Recipe and she is cured.
Betty did the Recipe and she is cured.

On the day you received your diagnosis and life sentence of Parkinson’s, you were not doing the Recipe. However, you are doing the Recipe now. Your faith is strong, you have a “can do” attitude, you are taking action, and you are seeing progress. You are worthy and deserving of overturning your Parkinson’s life sentence. You have the power to cure yourself, and you are.

Faith. Attitude. Action. Progress. Overturning the Life Sentence. You can do this!

You are worth it!!!

Have a Happy Valentine’s Day and a wonderful weekend!

All my best,

Howard

 

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6 Responses to Fighting Parkinson’s, and Parkinson’s is not a life sentence

  1. mayarita says:

    Thank-you Howard! Today I felt a little like I was on a sinking boat. This was the buoy I needed.
    Love to all on Valentines.

  2. Melanie says:

    I can relate to the feeling of being on a sinking boat. I needed that for today Howard, thank you so much for always being there and for sending these messages just the right time. Love to all Melanie

  3. Howard says:

    Hi Mayarita and Melanie.

    You are welcome. Thank you for your comments. Please remember that if you feel like you are on a sinking boat, you need to bail fear from your boat, https://www.fightingparkinsonsdrugfree.com/2012/10/08/fighting-parkinsons-and-bailing-fear-from-your-boat/.

    Blessings,
    Howard

  4. Debbie says:

    Thank you Howard,
    I loved all that you had to say today…but especially the part on action. I know I have a very positive attitude, but I do think that I have to be and do 100 percent. I feel like when I reach that 100 percent, I will reach the reward. Of course I most often fall short of 100 percent, and so up come the other scenarios. To much time is spent thinking…I should of done this…or when I do that. My best is good enough 🙂 I loved Karen’s May 15,2013 post. She was talking about being grateful. She said that she had never once been grateful for herself. The night she did so, she slept so well and felt happy. It is a very fitting idea for Valentines day. “Love yourself”
    Thanks everyone
    Have a Happy Valentines Day.

  5. Helen says:

    When I last spoke to Howard I felt down I was having one of those weeks because I found driving hard and felt my life was getting smaller. I had to pull myself up and saw my only hope was to call on divine help pray and feel the gift of self, connected to divine guidance and energy. This calmed me down and I prayed for help driving and realised it was my fear crippling me because of one remark from someone. I handed the fear over asked for help driving and felt calm, and was able to drive so much better. I am Back on my horse again enjoying life. Thank you Howard for the blog and all of you and divine help, sometimes life Parkinson’s recovery gets hard but I never give up.

  6. Allen Yarger says:

    That is the beauty of your program, it affords a concrete avenue for “action” in the form of the exercises. I can feel like a block of cement, physically and mentally, but even in this state I know I can do the exercises and as clumsy as the effort may be I always, and I mean always, feel much, much better afterwards. I come back to life. The exercises, aside from their intrinsic value, provide a concrete means of saying I don’t care how I feel or what negative thoughts I might be having I’m marching on. It is quite remarkable.

    Allen

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